Tips for Using Electrical Appliances

Bathroom accessories; i.e., electric toothbrush, hair dryer, electric shaver: Use a circuit protected with a Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI). Note: Most standard bathroom circuits are designed for hair dryers using no more than 1000 watts. Check the label on your hair dryer, it may be too strong for a "normal" bathroom circuit.

Microwave ovens: A separate 20 amp "dedicated" circuit on its own fuse or circuit breaker.

Dishwasher: Needs a separate 20 amp "dedicated" circuit.

Larger vacuum cleaners and irons: Plug directly into a 20 amp receptacle--usually found in kitchen and utility rooms.

TV, stereo, VCR, audio tape system: Check the wattage rating on each unit and limit load to 500 watts on a single room circuit. Add a separate circuit if necessary.

Electric blankets: Plug directly into an adequate receptacle with a 15 or 20 amp fuse or circuit breaker.

Personal computer system: A separate "dedicated" circuit on its own fuse or circuit breaker.

Portable electric space heater: Plug directly into a 3-pronged, grounded receptacle with a 15 or 20 amp fuse or circuit breaker. (1000 watt limit on any 15 amp circuit. 1500 watt limit on any 20 amp circuit.)

Outdoor equipment: Ground fault interrupter (GFI).

Home workshop tools: Purchase "double insulated" power tools.

Portable hot tub or spa: Needs a "dedicated" circuit with a GFI circuit breaker. Requires a 125 amp, or larger, electrical panel.

Kiln or arc welder: 220 volt circuit which may require a 200 amp, or larger, electrical panel.

Article: 
Electrical Systems