The Recipe

Liptauer is a spread made with a soft cheese and various herbs and spices and originates from a town in Hungary called Lipto. I understand that it was originally made with a fresh sheep or goat's cheese.

In some Central European restaurants the cheese is served on a platter with various ingredients on the side and one mixes the cheese as desired. The only place where I have seen it in the US was at Zabar's in New York (about 80th and Broadway). Knowing how easy it is to make, I didn't try Zabar's version. There are always too many other things that I want to try and get there.

The Recipe (as I know it):

 

  • Philadelphia style cream cheese
  • Some sour cream
  • Hungarian paprika
  • Caraway seeds
  • Salt
  • A small amount of mustard
  • Chopped fresh chives

 

I have also heard that one can add capers and anchovies.

How much of each? Sorry, I never measured nor saw anyone else measure the ingredients. "Our" Liptauer was always pink in color (from the paprika) and the rest was "to taste". I don't think that you can go very wrong with this one.

Some notes from my mother, Hilda our family's recipe book:

"Mix some sour cream with the cream cheese so that it is more spreadable. Add the other ingredients to taste and mix well.

"Use as a spread on bread; or, as seen in the picture with Hilda, 'fill' sections of green or red pepper and serve as an hors d'oeuvre."

 

Hilda "filling" Green Pepper Sections with Liptauer" Camano Island, Washington 1985

 

My mother learned to fill whole peppers with liptaur or egg salad and then cap the opening of the peeper with the trimmed off stem. She would often prepare this for my father when he had to go "active" with the IDF (the Israeli Army). Not knowing how long he would be gone, this was a good way to send along some food that would last for a few days. The pepper acted as "insulation" for the filling.

Traditionally (I think) it is served with a light rye bread but I am sure that the Kaiser will not object if you served it with crackers, with other vegetables, or...

George